Treehouse Children’s Disability Network Team

The Treehouse Children’s Disability Network Team (CDNT) at St. Gabriel’s Foundation is one of 7 CDNTs within the Mid-West region. All the Teams work under the umbrella of the Mid-West Children’s Disability Services.

We provide services to children aged from 0 to 18 years who have a developmental delay; are at risk of having a disability; or who have complex needs arising from a disability.

Services to families are provided in partnership with the following agencies:

  • Health Service Executive (HSE)
  • Brothers of Charity Services
  • Daughters of Charity
  • Enable Ireland
  • St. Gabriel’s Foundation

The 7 CDNTs are located at seven sites serving counties Limerick, Clare, and North Tipperary. Please click here to see map of all the network catchment areas

  • St Gabriel’s CDNT (Treehouse Team), Springfield Drive, Dooradoyle, Limerick
  • St Gabriel’s CDNT (South City Team) (currently under development)
  • Blackberry Park (CDNT), Blackberry Park, Dock Road, Limerick
  • West Limerick (CDNT), Gortboy, Newcastle West, Co. Limerick
  • East Limerick (CDNT), Eastway Business Park, Ballysimon Road, Limerick
  • North Tipperary (CDNT), Belmont, Nenagh, Co. Tipperary
  • Clare (CDNT), Lifford Rd, Ennis, Co. Clare

If you are concerned that your child may have a disability or a developmental delay you should discuss your concerns with your G.P., public health nurse or another member of your local primary care team.

The Children’s Disability Network Teams (CDNTs) offer an interdisciplinary assessment of children, with actual or potential developmental difficulties, to decide the nature and extent of a child’s needs.

Referrals for assessment to a CDNT can be made by health professionals after completing the Mid-West Children’s Disability Services Regional Referral Form and returning it to the appropriate team.

Please click on the following link to access the Regional Referral Form

Catchment Areas for the 7 CDNTs in the Mid-West can be viewed in the catchment area map which can be viewed here.

The following children should be referred to their local Children’s Disability Network Service:

Children up to their second year in primary school who:

1. have been diagnosed with, or are considered to be at risk of developing, a disability (physical or intellectual) and who have complex needs that require a team approach from a specialist disability service.
2. are, or have been, a ‘High Risk Neonate’ by meeting criteria a, b, or c below:

a. <29 weeks gestation
b. <1,500g birth weight c. Infants >1500g with history of any of the following:
c.1: broncho-pulmonary dysplasia (chronic lung disease or oxygen dependent for at least 4 weeks)
c.2: Grade 3-4 intraventricular haemorrhage
c.3: Retinopathy of Prematurity

3. term infants with birth asphyxia treated with Head Cooling

4. have been appropriately screened* by another service / referrer and who have a query of or diagnosis of ASD. This will include the broad definition of ASD as outlined in the UK National Autism Plan for Children (NAPC).

*Children presenting at first with a query of sensory and/or motor coordination difficulties will be seen by Primary Care Physiotherapists/ Occupational Therapists/Speech & Language Therapists and may be referred to the CDNT following a Paediatric Resource Clinic as per the ‘Procedure for the Operation of Paediatric Resource Clinics in the Mid-West Primary Care areas 1&2. To see this procedure document please click on the attached link

Children who have completed their second year in primary school who:

1. have primary physical, sensory (hearing or vision), or intellectual disabilities and who have complex developmental needs requiring input from a specialist disability team*.
2. have been appropriately screened by another service / referrer and who have a query of or diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). This will include the broad definition of ASD as outlined in the UK National Autism Plan for Children (NAPC).

*Children presenting at first with a query of sensory and/or motor coordination difficulties will be seen by Primary Care Physiotherapists/ Occupational Therapists/Speech & Language Therapists and may be referred to the School Age team following a Paediatric Resource Clinic as per the ‘Procedure for the operation of Paediatric Resource Clinics in the Mid-West Primary Care areas 1&2. To see this procedure document please click on the attached link (link to PRC)

The Treehouse CDNT have experience of working with children with developmental delay, disability and complex needs, and their families.

Our team is made up of psychologists, speech and language therapists, occupational therapists, physiotherapists, social workers and nurses.

All the professionals listed above are registered with either the Psychological Society of Ireland (PSI), CORU (Ireland’s multi-profession health regulator) or the Register of Nurses and Midwives.

Our team also includes a Children’s Disability Network Team Manager, Team Administrator, Clerical Officers and Therapy Assistants.

The Treehouse CDNT works with children and their families using a family-centred approach.

The objective of this approach is to help maximise a child’s independence and participation in all parts of their lives within their community.

Our team works in an inter-disciplinary way together with the child and family to identify needs and priorities; plan goals; and develop an Individual Family Service Plan (IFSP).

The CDNTs use a family-centred approach, seen internationally as the best model of practice in supporting children with disability or developmental delay and their families.

Research has proven that this approach provides the best outcomes for children and their families.

It is recognised that children develop and learn by taking part in daily life and activities with their family, school, and community. They learn through repeated interactions with the important people in their lives and by engaging in activities which are of interest to them.

A child’s development and learning are improved in their everyday life and environments with their family and carers who know them best. This means that children and their parents do not have to set aside “therapy time”, because learning occurs in everyday routines, activities, and opportunities.

It is the stimulation and motivation that parents and others who are close to the child provide on a daily basis that has a positive effect on their development.